Pleasanton

Housing Element Status
Certified
Rent Burden
45%
rent burdened
Affordable Housing Production
29%
affordable permits issued
Housing Policies and Programs
73
total policies
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Proposed Policies and Programs

Housing policies and programs are the strategies and laws that cities and counties legally have at their disposal to produce more and preserve existing affordable housing, as well as protect existing residents from getting displaced from their homes and communities.

5th Cycle Programs and Policies

73
policies and programs

Local housing policies and programs, as part of a housing element, have significant impacts on a city or county reaching its affordable housing goals. Each additional housing policy has a significant impact on the residents who are most in need of affordable housing. However, the number of policies or programs that a jurisdiction includes in their housing element is not meant to imply how well a city or county is addressing local housing needs since the quality and impact of each will need to be determined as well. Policies and programs listed here from jurisdictions’ Housing Elements are intended to allow readers to review the text themselves and see if a city or county is doing all they can to reach their affordable housing goals.

Historic 2018 Policies and Programs Categorization

To further policy innovation and local action, the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) contacted all of the region's jurisdictions to track the adoption of key housing policies throughout the nine county Bay Area in four major categories Protect, Preserve, Produce, and Prevent. This data is from ABAG’s Policies and Program list and was last updated in 2018/2019.

Protect
4/11
Preserve
4/9
Produce
5/14
Prevent
1/8
Acquisition/Rehabiliation/Conversion
Condominium Conversion Ordinance
General Fund Allocation
Homeowner Repair or Rehabilitation
Inclusionary Housing Ordinance
In-Lieu Fees (Inclusionary Zoning)
Locally-Funded Homebuyer Assistance
Reduced Fees or Permit Waivers
Streamlined Permitting Process
By-Right Strategies
Commercial Development Impact Fee
Flexible Parking Requirements
Form-Based Codes
Graduated Density Bonus
Home Sharing Programs
Housing Development Impact Fee
Housing Overlay Zones
Implementation of SB743
Just Cause Eviction
Mobile Homes Conversion Ordinance
One-to-One Replacement
Preservation of Mobile Homes (Rent Stabilization Ordinance)
Rent Stabilization
SRO Preservation Ordinance
Surplus Public Lands Act
Tenant-Based Assistance
Pleasanton's Recorded Housing Policies

The California Department of Housing and Community Development tracks all of the ongoing and completed programs from 2018 onward and can be seen in the table below.

For specific cities we have compiled the 2023 data from housing elements to be viewed and downloaded here.
YEAR
PROGRAM NAME
PROGRAM OBJECTIVE
STATUS
ACCOMPLISHED DATE
HOUSING CYCLE
2022
Program 38.2: Encourage the development of second units and shared housing in R-1 zoning districts to increase the number of housing units while preserving the visual character within existing neighborhoods of single-family detached homes.
Strongly encourage residential infill in areas where public facilities are or can be made to be adequate to support such development.
The City continues to encourage the development of accessory dwelling units and adopted a revised Accessory Dwelling Unit Ordinance in 2021.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 16.2: Continue to coordinate public information with surrounding communities to provide up-to-date listings of opportunities for regional affordable housing and programs for extremely low-, low- and very-low-income households.
Educate the public regarding the community, environmental, and economic benefits of Pleasanton’s affordable housing program.
In 2022 the City continued to provide public information regarding regional affordable housing and available programs. The City also promote Alameda County's online housing portal (http://housing.acgov.org) which provides listings for affordable rental housing opportunities and where interested applicants can submit their affordable rental housing applications online.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 35.1: Maintain building and housing code enforcement programs, and monitor project conditions of approval.
Eliminate all substandard housing conditions within the community.
The City continues to maintain active Building and Code Enforcement programs. The City responds to resident complaints related to Building Code and Housing Code violations on an ongoing basis.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 36.1: Regularly assess the need for workforce housing (including stock, type and quantity of housing) in the community. Develop routine planning and economic development activities to better integrate assessment information into efforts that produce a built environment responsive to the need for workforce housing, in accordance with the Economic Development Strategic Plan. The City Council shall consider the appropriate steps to address the identified needs.
Encourage development of workforce housing that helps to achieve the goals of the Economic Development Strategic Plan.
In 2023, the City held discussions and considered a preliminary proposal to participate, through the California Statewide Communities Development Authority (CSCDA) Workforce Housing Program, in acquisition and conversion of a market-rate apartment project to deed-restricted housing. Ultimately, this effort was not pursued, although the City remains receptive to the concept if the long-term workforce housing benefits were found to be substantial. Additional study of workforce housing needs was conducted as part of the 6th Cycle Housing Element Update’s Housing Needs Assessment, and updates to the actions and programs to support workforce housing goals, will be incorporated into the 6th Cycle Housing Element.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 15.7: Continue to work with non-profit and for-profit housing developers, service providers, Pleasanton employers, the Pleasanton Unified School District, and urban planning specialists to develop new programs and incentives for meeting the full range of Pleasanton’s future affordable housing needs.
Make appropriate modifications to the Land Use Element of the General Plan, Zoning Ordinance, and other City ordinances, programs, and policies to facilitate the provision of housing, especially housing for those with disabilities (including developmental disabilities), and housing affordable to moderate , low , and very low income households.
As noted previously, the City continues to work with nonprofit and for-profit developers and collaborates with non-profit housing agencies and other Tri-Valley cities to develop new programs and incentives to meet the full range of housing needs within the City. In 2018, the Pleasanton City Council approved the Sunflower Hill project, which provides 31 affordable multifamily residential units to be designated for individuals with developmental disabilities. Construction was completed in 2020.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 9.3: Advocate changes in Federal and State legislation to provide incentives for the development of housing for special needs and housing affordable to extremely low-, low- and very low-income households and to overcome barriers to housing affordable to low- and very low-income households.
Support the development of housing for persons with special needs.
The City continues to advocate Federal and State legislative changes and provides general support to legislative efforts on an ongoing basis.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 16.1: Continue housing education programs available on the City’s website, at other public venues, through City publications and mailings, and through partnerships with regional organizations.
Educate the public regarding the community, environmental, and economic benefits of Pleasanton’s affordable housing program.
In 2022 the City continued to provide updated information in electronic (i.e., web) and printed format to educate private citizens, developers, and other interested parties on the range of programs promoting affordable housing.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 38.1: Maintain existing zoning of infill sites at densities compatible with infrastructure capacity and General Plan Map designations.
Strongly encourage residential infill in areas where public facilities are or can be made to be adequate to support such development.
The City continues to maintain existing zoning of infill sites with densities consistent with the General Plan. This program is implemented on an ongoing basis.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 43.5: Give priority for the production of housing for persons with disabilities in infill locations, which are accessible to City services.
Provide for the special-housing needs of large households, the elderly, persons with disabilities including developmental disabilities, extremely low income households, the homeless, farmworkers, and families with single-parent heads of households.
The City continues to give priority to housing for persons with disabilities. Sites for new high density housing are located in infill locations and accessible to transit and commercial services.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 43.6: Encourage the provision of special-needs housing, such as community care facilities for the elderly, and persons with disabilities (including developmental disabilities) in residential and mixed-use areas, especially near transit and other services. The City will provide regulatory incentives such as expedited permit processing in conformance with the Community Care Facilities Act and fee reductions where the development would result in an agreement to provide below-market housing or services. The City provides fee reductions per Pleasanton Municipal Code Chapter 18.86 (Reasonable Accommodations) on the basis of hardship. The City will maintain flexibility within the Zoning Ordinance to permit such uses in non-residential zoning districts.
Provide for the special-housing needs of large households, the elderly, persons with disabilities including developmental disabilities, extremely low income households, the homeless, farmworkers, and families with single-parent heads of households.
The City provides fee reductions per Code Chapter 18.86 (Reasonable Accommodations) of the Pleasanton Municipal Code and continues to encourage special-needs and affordable housing for the elderly and those with disabilities.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 35.3: Supplement CDBG funds with the City’s Lower-Income Housing Fund for rehabilitation of housing units affordable to extremely low-, low- and very-low-income households.
Eliminate all substandard housing conditions within the community.
In 2022, the City continued to supplement CDBG funds with other funding sources. The City's Housing Rehabilitation Program was funded through a combination of local (City Lower Income Housing Funds) and federal HOME funds.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 43.7: Require some units to include Universal Design and accessibility features for all new residential projects receiving governmental assistance, including tax credits, land grants, fee waivers, or other financial assistance. Consider requiring some units to include Universal Design and accessibility features in all other new residential projects to improve the safety and utility of housing for all people, including home accessibility for people aging in place and for people with disabilities.
Provide for the special-housing needs of large households, the elderly, persons with disabilities including developmental disabilities, extremely low income households, the homeless, farmworkers, and families with single-parent heads of households.
The City continues to require universal design for larger new residential projects. Inclusion of universal design elements was required as a condition of approval for all new projects involving new construction of 15 or more multifamily dwellings, both ownership and rental housing eligible projects must provide a minimum of 10 percent of the total units as universally designed units that meet standard condition requirements.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 47.5: The City will work in good faith with non-profit and for-profit developers to secure property, within Pleasanton and its current sphere of influence, for the development of well-designed affordable housing for families with children in Pleasanton.
Implement Resolution 10-390, requiring enhancements to existing non-discrimination housing policies.
The City continues to explore opportunities within the current sphere of influence to develop affordable housing for families with children throughout the City.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 12.1: Maintain zoning adequate to accommodate Pleasanton’s share of the regional housing need for all income levels. Sites designated High Density Residential or Mixed Use shall be developed at a minimum density of 30 units per acre, and comport with the adopted Housing Site Development Standards and Design Guidelines for Multifamily Development.
Strive toward meeting Pleasanton's share of regional housing needs, as defined by the Regional Housing Needs Determination (RHND).
The City continues to monitor the zoning within the City to accommodate all RHNA needs. This is implemented on an ongoing basis.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 37.1: Provide and maintain existing sites zoned for multi-family housing, especially in locations near existing and planned transportation and other services, as needed to ensure that the City can meets its share of the regional housing need.
Disperse high-density housing throughout the community, in areas near public transit, major thoroughfares, shopping, and employment centers.
The City continues to maintain existing residential sites near transportation corridors and services as needed to ensure that the City can meet its share of regional housing needs.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 46.1: Implement the applicable housing related air quality, climate change, green building, water conservation, energy conservation, and community character programs of the Pleasanton General Plan, including: ·      Policy 6 and programs 6.1 and 6.3 of the Air Quality and Climate Change Element; ·      Programs 1.5, 1.7, 1.8, 1.12, 1.13, 1.14, and 3.12 of the Water Element; ·      Program 9.1 of the Community Character Element; ·      Policies 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 and programs 2.1-2.7, 3.1-3.5, 4.1-4.3, 6.1-6.4, 7.1-7.3, and 7.6 of the Energy Element
Preserve and enhance environmental quality in conjunction with the development of housing, including additions and remodels.
The City continues to implement applicable housing related air quality, climate change, green building, water conservation, energy conservation, and community character programs of the Pleasanton General Plan. This is implemented on an ongoing basis through project review.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 15.4: Support State legislative reform to improve the fair-share housing process and provide financial and other incentives to strengthen local jurisdictions’ abilities to meet their fair-share responsibilities.
Make appropriate modifications to the Land Use Element of the General Plan, Zoning Ordinance, and other City ordinances, programs, and policies to facilitate the provision of housing, especially housing for those with disabilities (including developmental disabilities), and housing affordable to moderate , low , and very low income households.
The City continues to advocate Federal and State legislative changes and provides general support on an ongoing basis.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 18.2: Continue to exempt all housing units affordable to low- and very low-income households from the low income housing fee.
Use the lower-income-housing fee to generate funds for the provision of housing affordable to extremely low-, low- and very low-income households. The low-income housing fund should be used primarily to leverage State and Federal funds in the development of housing affordable to low- and very low-income households and in-house loan programs, so that the fund may be used most efficiently and maintained over time. When considering allocation of these funds, priority will be given to non-profit housing developers with a project including three bedroom units affordable to large extremely low, low- and very low-income households.
The City has continued to exempt all affordable housing units from the low income housing fee in 2022. As the City works on future projects, the expectation is that all units affordable to low- and very low-income households will be eligible for a waiver of the from payment of the Lower Income Housing Fee in conformance with the City's long-standing policy.
Ongoing
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 12.3: Strive to construct, rehabilitate, and conserve the City’s regional share of housing within the constraints of available infrastructure, traffic, air quality, and financial limits, by the conclusion of the current Regional Housing Needs Determination period – in 2023.
Strive toward meeting Pleasanton's share of regional housing needs, as defined by the Regional Housing Needs Determination (RHND).
The City continues to strive to construct housing within the constraints of available infrastructure, traffic, air quality, and financial limits. Combined, the City’s 2015-2023 housing sites inventory can accommodate at least 3,243 units.
By 2023
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
2022
Program 14.1: Preserve for the longest term feasible, rent restricted assisted projects affordable to extremely low-, low- and very-low-income households, and provide assistance to retain below-market rate rent restrictions.
Preserve for the longest term feasible, restricted units affordable to extremely low-, low- and very-low-income households which are at risk of changing to market-rate housing.
Since 2001, all regulatory agreements have included a provision that the terms shall apply in perpetuity (or for 99 years if restricted due to financing requirements). The City continues to implement this policy on all new projects.
Ongoing and when units become at risk of converting to market rate.
5th cycle, 2013 to 2022
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